I had conversations this past week with several friends about people in their organizations who said they were going to do something and they didn’t.

You know these people. They are the first to make these statements: 

“Well I’m experienced in doing ________________ (fill in the blank) and I’ll be glad to take charge of this for you.”

“I’ve got some good contacts who can help us with______________ (fill in the blank) and I’ll call them.”

“Don’t worry I’ll have that done by__________________   (fill in the blank).”

“Thanks for bringing this to my attention, I’ll have that corrected by _____________  (fill in the blank).”

“I’m sorry I missed the meeting. I know you were counting on me but ________________   (fill in the blank).”

“Oh, I’m sorry I forgot. I have been so busy with _____________ (fill in the blank)”

These situations are not only personally frustrating but detrimental to the organization. Organizations exist so that people who share the same goals and aspirations can accomplish something. 

“Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me”

Your goal would not to be fooled even once.

    1. Be aware of the people in your organization who make empty promises
    2. Be ready to respond to their statements by asking for deadlines
    3. Hold them to the agreed upon deadline
    4. When they don’t perform, ask them why
    5. Decide your tolerance level for the number of excuses you will allow them
    6. When you have reached your tolerance for excuses, reassign the task and tell them why.
    7. It is then up to them to rebuild trust

Coach John Wooden said, “Don’t tell me what you can do, show me.”

Have a Great Masonic Day!

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